BiliolgaMusic.com

 
 
 

www.MeetTheBeatles.us
Welcome to The Official
Meet The Beatles Home Page

A nostalgic look back at
Beatlemania in early 1964
inspired by the popular song "Meet The Beatles"
by Bill Naughton, Jr.
copyright 2014 BiliolgaMusic (ASCAP)




"Meet The Beatles" was issued as a digital single on January 20, 2014 to commerate the 50th anniversay of the release of the Meet The Beatles! album and the beginning of Beatlemania in the United States.


Listen to it and download it FREE at:
billnaughtonjr.bandcamp.com
soundcloud.com/billnaughtonjr
reverbnation.com/billnaughtonjr
cdbaby.com/cd/billnaughtonjr


"Meet The Beatles" is also the lead track on the album Songwriter, Volume 1, also available now as a FREE digital download at the links above, or you can get the actual CD, in beautifully designed 6 panel eco-wallet with 3 panels of lyrics, complete liner notes and front cover, back cover and on-disc photography for any donation to the songwriter's "Catch Up Campaign." Details are on the Biliolga Music Home Page and the Songwriter, Volume 1 page.


Please check out and "like" the Facebook page that I developed for the song:
MEET THE BEATLES BY BILL NAUGHTON JR.

Meet The Beatles
(words and music by Bill Naughton, Jr.)
c 2014 BiliolgaMusic, ASCAP
Bill Naughton, Jr.
with Terry Miggins, Jay Miggins and Jerry Clapis
produced by Michael Arafeh
at The Coffeehouse Recording Studio in Middletown, CT



"Wow, that song lyrically mirrors a lot of people's Beatles experience.
 It certainly strikes a chord with everyone in our group!"
Ron McNeil, founding member of The Fab Four.

"I've heard a lot of tributes to the Fab Four in my life 
but this one really captures the spirit."

The first comment from a buyer on iTunes.


Beatles Magazine became the first publication to mention the song
"Meet The Beatles" with a post that was shared on their multiple sites and formats on January 20, 2014. Thank you to Lovely Rita, Beatles Magazine General Manager! (www.BeatlesMagazine.Blogspot.com)



Thanks to the Facebook pages who have allowed me to post information about "Meet the Beatles" and assisted in promoting the song.
Please visit and "Like" these pages on Facebook:
The Beatles Universe
  My beatles page
Beatles Forever
beatles
The Beatles
John Lennon news and biography
Portal Beatles Brasil
The Beatles Fanatics Group
Beatles 4Ever
The Beatles Fan Club
I Love Beatles Music
Beatles-A-Rama

 
Beatle Brunch, a nationally syndicated radio show hosted by Joe Johnson, featured the song "Meet The Beatles" on the February 9, 2014 show!
Check their website, www.BrunchRadio.com

If you're coming here from Beatlelinks.net, welcome! I'm glad you found us!

"Thanks for linking back to my site! That's a nice song you wrote,
you sound like a good long-time fan."

Creator of and Webmaster for
www.Beatlelinks.net



 

click on a link below to go directly to that feature:

Meet The Beatles - The Song

Meet The Beatles - Song Lyrics

Meet The Beatles - The  Album Cover

Meet The Beatles 1964 Record Store Advertising Display

Interview With Songwriter Bill Naughton, Jr.

Meet The Beatles - The Movie: A Fictional Review

Meet The Beatles - The Movie: The Script Outline

Biliolga Music - Contact Information
Beatlemania in the U.S. by Bill Naughton, Jr.
The Beatles First U.S. Visit and The Ed Sullivan Show 1964
Record Sleeves For The Beatles' First Three Hit 45s In The U.S.
The Top 5 Best Selling Records in the U.S. for the week of 4-4-64
Introducing The Beatles - The Story of the First U.S. Beatles Album

Meet The Beatles - The First Capitol Records album
The Album Capitol Records Misleadingly Titled The Beatles Second Album
The Canadian Beatles Albums - The First Released in North America
Four By The Beatles - The Capitol Records EP
A Hard Day's Night - The Movie Sound Track Album in the U.S.
Something New - Another Capitol Records Patchwork Album

The Beatles' First U.S. Tour - August and September 1964

Beatles '65 - A Variation on the Beatles For Sale album

Recap: The First Year of Beatlemania in the United States
Meet The Beatles And A Few Other Fan Magazines From Early 1964
The Four Teen Screen Individual Beatle Magazines From Early 1964
A Few Beatles Paperback Books From Early 1964
Authentic Beatles Memorabilia  From Early 1964
The Beatles Bubble Gum Cards - The Complete First Series: # 1-60

Link To The No Budget, Home Made Ukulele Video On You Tube


"John, Paul, George and Ringo with guitars and bass and drums."


 

Meet The Beatles

The Story Behind The Song
by Bill Naughton, Jr., songwriter.

One day I heard someone on the radio say something about the album Meet  The Beatles! and I thought to myself that as far as I know, no one had
 ever written a song called Meet The Beatles, so I set out to do that. I made up
 some words, a melody came to me, and I started writing the song. I worked
 really hard on it and I lived with it for quite a while, and when I finally thought it was ready to share, I played it on my ukulele for my kids, and they loved it! 
 What really impressed me was the fact that they remembered it right away
 and they started singing along with me. That told me a lot about the song. I thought if these little kids can remember it and sing it after hearing it only a
 few times, then maybe it was better than even I thought it was. After an initial attempt to pitch the song to various recording artists I decided to make the record myself with the help of Terry Miggins on guitar and Jerry Clapis on bass from the Connecticut tribute band Beatles Forever, and Terry's brother, Jay Miggins, on drums and percussion. We recorded the song at The Coffeehouse Recording Studio in Middletown, CT with owner and producer Michael Arafeh and it was released for digital download on January 20, 2014, the 50th anniversary of the US release of the landmark album Meet The Beatles! It's a FREE download via the links posted above. I hope you like it.



 

 

   

 

        

Click on the music player to hear the song   



 

Meet The Beatles
(words and music by Bill Naughton, Jr.)
copyright 2014 BiliolgaMusic (ASCAP)

Back in nineteen sixty four when I was only five,
I listened to the records that my parents played each night,
Sometimes they played Bob Dylan and sometimes they played some Bach,
A little Bossa Nova and some country and some pop...

And I never will forget the time Mom brought home something new,
She said it was an English band from a place called Liverpool,
It was different than the music that I heard on other nights,
My Mom played Meet The Beatles and that music changed my life...

-chorus-

Meet the Beatles everybody here they come,
John, Paul, George and Ringo, with guitars and bass and drums,
My Dad was not convinced at first but I was on cloud nine,
My Mom played Meet The Beatles and that music changed my life...

By the time I turned fourteen my friends and I had formed a band,
And everyone who's played with us has been a Beatles fan,
Their songs still sound as good today as they did back that first time,
My Mom played Meet The Beatles and that music changed my life...

-repeat chorus-

-bridge-

From coast to coast........all across America.......
 DJs on the radio.......ignited Beatlemania........
 ah........ah........ah........ah..........ah........

-repeat chorus-


My Mom played Meet The Beatles and that music changed my life...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 






 

Interview with singer-songwriter
Bill Naughton,Jr.
writer of the song
"Meet The Beatles."


*permission granted to any media to quote any part of the following.


Singer-songwriter Bill Naughton, Jr. recording his song "Meet The Beatles"
at The Coffeehouse Recording Studio, Middletown, CT, November 15, 2013.


Question: Tell me how you happened to write the song, where did the idea come from? And let me ask you what everybody who has heard it wants to know, is the song autobiographical?

Response: Well, let me answer the last question first, no it’s not autobiographical, in the sense that the event didn’t really happen to me the way I wrote about it in my song. I actually made it all up. But at the same time, I realize that it’s probably real, or close to being real, for someone, somewhere. I think a lot of people will be able to relate to it, I worked real hard to make it believable, and I think it is. I’ll walk you through the process of writing it, and tell you exactly how I came up with the idea and what I did to bring it to life.

First I have to say that that when I started writing the song it was just an experiment in songwriting and I was writing it for my kids. They’re both big Beatles fans, we play the music in the house and in the car all the time and they just picked up on it. We also have a complete set of the Beatles Cartoons which were originally shown on Saturday morning television in the 60s and we watch those together all the time.

So we’re a real Beatles family to start with, and then one day I heard Joe Johnson on Beatle Brunch say something about the album Meet The Beatles! and I  thought “as far as I know, no one’s ever written a song called Meet The Beatles, so I set out to do that. I thought the kids would like it. And it took off from there, I immediately started knocking some ideas around in my head and some lyrics started to come to me, and then I just started singing and I realized I had the beginning of a melody and before the end of that day I had a basic song outline on a piece of paper, some words and a simple melody that was easy to remember. That was my starting point.

From there, I spent quite a bit of time working on the lyrics. I really wanted the song to be believable, and historically accurate, so it had to be set in 1964, the year the record album Meet The Beatles! was released in the United States. And that became the first line, “Back in 1964 when I was only five.”

Now I’ve said that the song is not autobiographical, and here’s a big reason why: I was not five in 1964. But it doesn’t matter if someone was five, or ten, or fifteen when they first heard The Beatles and realized that this was a life changing experience. For some it was the Ed Sullivan Show, for others it might have been A Hard Day’s Night, or Sgt. Pepper, or Abbey Road. Kids these days are discovering The Beatles through the parents, or even their grand parents. I imagine there’s someone in the world who can say “back in twenty oh-four when I was only five.” But that wouldn’t work in a song, as I said I strived for authenticity, so the song had to be set in 1964. And the kid had to have been five. For this song, nothing else would have worked for that line. It’s the first of many writing techniques that I employed throughout the song. I used a lot of
alliteration, which I’ll explain, and a few more subtle techniques like the use of “four” and “five” back to back in the first line. Honestly, if the kid was eight, or ten, or twelve, it just wouldn’t have sounded as good. Four and five go together, and the ear likes the sound of that, even though the listener probably has no idea why, the mind registers that there’s a balance there, these two words go together, it just sounds right. And it’s not by chance. It’s intentional on the part of the writer. Listen to some great songs and you’ll hear literary techniques like this throughout the lyrics.

In the second line I had to use the word “records” because music was not listened to on any other format back then. That was before 8-tracks, cassettes, compact discs or digital downloads. It was 33 rpm or 45 rpm records. So the kid says: “I listened to the records that my parents played each night.”  I used a little alliteration here, with “parents played,” the double-p, back to back. It’s all very natural, most people don’t even notice it but it makes the words sound like they belong together.

Now the next line two lines are perhaps the most interesting lines in the song, because I’ve set up the scenario, the five year old is growing up with parents who appreciate music and listen to records every night. So I wanted to take this a natural step further, and I worked really hard on this line because I wanted to present a variety of music that was relevant to the time period, and it had to flow well. I have to admit that Bob Dylan was not in my early versions of the song, it was actually Merle Haggard. But because I’m a former radio disc-jockey, I still have all these music history books and lists of record charts and best sellers, and so after singing the song for a few weeks with Merle Haggard in the lyrics I discovered that he didn’t have any records out as early as 1964, so I had to come up with another name that would fit into the rhythm of the verse, and I’m really happy that I came up with Bob Dylan. Dylan had two record albums out by that time, including Freewheelin', and Peter, Paul and Mary had hits with two of his songs in 1963, "Blowin’ In The Wind" and "Don’t Think Twice It’s All Right." And it actually worked better because there’s alliteration here too with “Bob” and “Bach,” and I already had “Bach” in there for a rhyme with “rock,” which I changed to “pop” when I realized that “rock” was not a term that was used in 1964. I mean there was “rock ‘n roll,” Chuck Berry had written and recorded "Rock 'n Roll Music" in the late 50s, but not just “rock,” that didn’t come into use until later in the 60s. Hit music was “pop” music in 1964, the record charts were the “pop charts.” The Meet The Beatles! album cover actually says, “The first album by England’s phenomenal pop combo.” So “rock” had to be changed to “pop,” and the great thing about it is that it’s still a good rhyme with “Bach.” And the alliteration continues with “Bosa” in the fourth line, again, authentic 1964. Bossa Nova music was introduced to the world in1959 in the movie Black Orpheus, and in 1963 Getz and Gilberto had a hugely successful record album that included "The Girl From Ipanema." So it makes sense that this musical family would have some Bossa Nova music in their collection along with, as I wrote,  “some country and some pop.” So I think I covered just about everything here, with the exception of maybe Motown, which I considered, but Motown was actually pop music back then, and when I had to drop Merle Haggard from the lyrics I decided to use “country” here because “country” was very distinct from “pop” in 1964, it was actually still "country and western" back then. And also I was thinking about Randy Travis when I was first started singing this song, so it made sense that I go with “country.” It helps balance the first verse, keeps it authentic, and it leads very nicely into the second verse.

Question: It sounds like the chords change a bit at the start of the second verse, but then quickly return to where you'd expect them to be.

Response: That actually happened later, after I was pretty much done with the lyrics, I realized that the first and second verses were musically identical and I didn’t really like that, so I came up with the minor chords to start the second verse, and I think it makes a big difference in the overall feel of the melody. I have to admit that up to that point I still wasn’t sure about the melody, and I was still thinking of sending the lyrics to my song writing partner, Lou Gerolami, to see what he could come up with. He’s written some beautiful melodies for my lyrics.

But when I came up with those minor chords for the second verse I really started liking the feel of the song and I decided to stay with my melody. What really sold me on it was when I played it for my kids, they picked up on it right away, they remembered the melody and after hearing it only a couple times they started singing it from memory. That told me a lot about the melody. I thought if these kids can remember it after hearing it just a couple times, then others would be able to do that too. So I realized I probably had a pretty good, catchy, easy to remember melody and I decided to stay with it. I especially like the chorus, I think it’s a real good hook.

So the second verse starts with that switch to a minor chord when I sing, “I never will forget the time Mom brought home something new, she said it was an English band from a place called Liverpool.” Those words just kind of fell onto the paper, I was just a scribe. They came to me complete. I never changed a thing about them. Then it goes back to the major chords from the first verse when I say, “It was different than the music that I heard on other nights,” and it leads right into the hook that takes us into the chorus, “My Mom played Meet The Beatles! and that music changed my life.” I actually use this line five times in the song. With the exception of perhaps the first line of the chorus, which includes the title, it’s probably the most important line in the song, “My Mom played Meet The Beatles! and that music changed my life.” That's the theme, the whole song is wrapped around that, the fact that this music really had an effect on this particular five year old kid.

Question: You said you really like the chorus. Did that just fall out of your head too or did that take a lot of effort?

Response:  I worked on that a lot. The first line right after the title was tough to finish, and the second line wasn’t much easier. The chorus took awhile. It’s really just three new lines because it leads back into the last line of the second verse, which as I said is one of the major hooks in the song, “My Mom played Meet The Beatles! and that music changed my life,” but those lines are so important, I spent a lot of time working on them. I got the title in there where it belongs, leading off the chorus, and then I struggled with the rest of it. I knew where it had to end up, the last line was on paper before the first three were finished.

So after I wrote down “Meet The Beatles,” I finally came up with “everybody, here they come,” and that may sound kind of simple and almost like a throwaway line but it’s anything but that, there’s a reason why I decided on that line. One is I was simultaneously working on the second line of the chorus, and I’d already decided to say, “John, Paul, George and Ringo with guitars and bass and drums,” and I needed the rhyme, but more than that, and here it is again, it’s authentic.

The media theme in the United States back in early 1964 was “Get ready, here come The Beatles!” In fact, the cover story of Life Magazine in January 1964 was, “Here Come Those Beatles!” So I wrote, “Meet The Beatles everybody, here they come,” and it’s has that authenticity that I was striving for. It sounds simple, and it is, but it works, because it’s true.

It's important that it’s the Mom who played the record for the family because in 1964 The Beatles appealed mostly to young people and females. Not so much men, at least at first. Teenage boys yes, but grown men, not so much at first. Men might have felt put off, perhaps even somewhat threatened by these wild, long haired Liverpudlians that their girls and women were swooning over. This was not Tony Bennett, The Beatles were something entirely new and they seemed to come out of nowhere with all this music, not just a hit single but five hit singles, and two albums, all at once here in the United States.

Actually, my inspiration for the line "My Dad was not convinced at first," comes right out of the video The Beatles First US Visit. There's a scene where a family is gathered around the television watching The Beatles on the Ed Sullivan Show, and the Mom and the kids are really into it, but the Dad is sitting there stone faced. When the song ends, Dad actually starts clapping for a moment but then quickly remembers his place and reverts back to his stoic "man of the house" role, and adopts again that look that indicates, "Dad is not convinced." So I wrote that line based on that scene, and created the contrast between Mom and the five year old child on one side, and Dad on the other side.

Question: You actually put that much thought into each line? 

Response: Some people might think it's easy because it sounds so simple, and it is simple, but that's the point. To make it sound simple and appealing to the listener is a lot of work and it can be frustrating at times. But when it turns out good like this one did, it's worth the effort.

Question: So now you've got the first two verses and the chorus. How did you get the third verse, and why jump ahead, what, nine years?

Response: Third verses are always the most difficult, at least for me. I've got dozens of little first verses floating around, first verses come easiest, second verses are more of a challenge, and third verses are usually the toughest to complete, unless you're Bob Dylan maybe. I heard he writes dozens of verses and then chooses the best ones for the song. I wish I could do that but there's only one Bob Dylan, and maybe even he's not doing now what he did in the 60s. But this third verse took quite awhile to come together, even though I knew where I was going to end up on the fourth line, it had to be the same as the last line of the second verse, leading back into the chorus. So I really only had three lines to write, but they didn't come easy. A lot of cross-outs on paper, a lot of false starts, but I really like what I ended up with. I think it works really well.

Why the jump to age fourteen? It just happened, I mean what else could the five year old say or do? And I didn't think he could be in a band at age nine or ten, so I actually had to jump right out of the
Beatles years. If you count the years you see that it goes from 1964 to 1973, just like that. The Beatles broke up in 1970. Paul McCartney released his fifth post-Beatles album in 1973, that was Band On The Run, by the way. But that was the only thing that would work for this song. I could have said "By the time I got to high school," or he could have been ten or twelve, but in retrospect, I don't think anything could have worked better than what I wrote. "By the time I turned fourteen my friends and I had formed a band," I really love that line. The alliteration of the triple-f with "fourteen," "friends," and "formed," really make that line special. It sounds so nice, and natural. I worked quite a while on that, it just didn't happen, I really worked on that. It's not that often that you get to use triple alliteration in the same line, and you can't force it or it'll sound unnatural. On this particular line, it works. I love it. And the next line "Everyone who's played with us has been a Beatles fan," just follows nicely. Once I had the first line of the verse, the second line kind of fell into place. I was happy to get the word "Beatles" into a line of the third verse, I thought that was effective. The third line seemed to take forever, and I tried a lot of words there until I hit on what I thought was about as perfect a lead-in to the last line as I could possibly come up with. I had just used the word "Beatles" so all I had to do was refer to them, and I came up with, "Their songs still sound as good today as they did back that first time," which leads seamlessly into the last line of the verse, "My Mom played Meet The Beatles! and that music changed my life." That flows right into the chorus, then the bridge which is really catchy, especially the "Twist and Shout" like vocal hook, then back to the chorus and out. I really like it. I think it's a very good song.

Question: Did you know right away, or did you feel when you finished the song that you had written something special?

Response: I liked it, but I didn't know if it would appeal to anyone else. I didn't think that I had a hit song or anything like that. I didn't know what to think. So I lived with it for awhile. I didn't tell anyone that I had written it. Not my family, my kids, my friends. I just kept it to myself, for a few weeks at least.  I played it on my guitar and I was starting develop some feelings for it. It's like a relationship you know, some songwriters say that their songs are like children to them, but that's not what I mean. I was starting to get a little excited about it. Then one night I picked up my ukulele and figured out how to play the ukulele chords and that's when it all came together for me. The ukulele really brought the song to life. So I found my kids and I said, "Hey guys, listen to this, I want to play you a song I just wrote, tell me what you think." And I played it for them on ukulele, and they loved it. They actually started singing it with me the first time they heard it. They made me play it over and over again, and my wife joined in, and that was the night we all fell in love with the song. I thought if these little kids could sing the words and remember the melody after hearing it once, then others would be able to do that too, and I started to think maybe I had something special here. So it became a ukulele song that night, I really like the happy, bouncy kind of groove I get when I play it on the ukulele. I think it really makes the song come alive. So we're recording two versions of the song, one is an up-tempo guitar based version with a wicked guitar riff that will be the lead single off my first album.

Question: I understand you're going to record more songs.

Response: I have over 30 songs that I've written that I want to record so I have plans to record and release two albums. That way I'll have all my material out there for people to listen to and, hopefully, some artists will pick up on a few of my songs and record new versions for their albums. A few of these songs could become big hits for someone, I have a couple good country songs that could do very well for the right singer. I'm recording with Michael Arafeh at The Coffeehouse Recording Studio in Middletown, Connecticut and I'm very fortunate to have two great musicians from the Connecticut tribute band Beatles Forever playing with me, Terry Miggins on lead guitar and Jerry Clapis on bass. And Terry's brother Jay Miggins, a former record promotion executive, is adding all the percussion.

I think the song "Meet the Beatles" has a very good chance to become popular when it's tied into the 50th anniversary celebration of the US release of the album Meet the Beatles! which will occur on January 20, 2014, and the onset of Beatlemania in the US in early 1964, 50 years ago. The song is basically a tribute to all that. It's a very catchy song and very well produced. I think it's got a pretty good chance to get some radio airplay and it might just take off.

 

 

 

                           MEET THE BEATLES 
          The Movie - A Fictional Review.

MEET THE BEATLES is an interesting film based on a very catchy original song written by former radio disc-jockey Bill Naughton, Jr. ("Meet The Beatles" copyright 2014, Biliolga Music). The song has received major radio airplay and has been the number one digital download on both iTunes and Amazon since its release on January 20, 2014. The songwriter actually wrote the original outline for the movie, contributed to the creation of the final script, and served as a consultant during the filming. It's a fine film, well directed with good acting and great music. It's a must see for anyone who is a Beatles fan, especially for anyone who experienced Beatlemania in the United States in early 1964.

The film covers a 46 year period, from February 1964 into 2010, and follows the life and times of a character who is introduced to us as a 5 year old boy in 1964. In the opening scene, the boy’s mother comes home from a day of shopping with the newly released album Meet The Beatles!, and that night she plays it for her family. Although the Dad in the house, a younger Ozzie Nelson type, is not convinced at first, as was true for many Dads in 1964, the boy later recalls in the song how “that music changed my life,” and the film uses that as its starting point and builds on that theme. The degree to which the album Meet The Beatles! had an effect on the life of the 5 year old boy is played out in the film, which accurately and creatively recalls and recreates events in the lives of not only the boy and his family, but the four Beatles as well. Solo songs are used as transitions, flashbacks feature Beatles songs.

The film opens with a scene from February 7, 1964, the day The Beatles arrived at Kennedy International Airport in New York City. The mother is seen traveling in her car while running around shopping, and the announcer on the car radio, Murray the K from WINS, is covering the first big press conference for The Beatles. The woman then goes into the record department of a major department store where teenagers have all but taken over, and everything about the scene screams “Beatles!” She chooses two 45s to bring home, and then makes a spontaneous decision to buy the album Meet The Beatles! When she gets home and mentions to her husband that she bought the Beatles record, he’s somewhat more than taken aback, “But isn’t that music for little kids? I mean, it’s loud and noisy, and those haircuts! I mean come on. That’s pretty weird, don’t you think?” She replies, “I don’t know, I mean yeah, the kids are all buying it, but I’ve heard a couple songs and they sound pretty catchy. It just seems interesting, that’s all. It’s different, maybe because they’re from England, I don’t know. We’ll play it later and see what the buzz is all about.” Making a sour face, her husband tries for the last word by exclaiming, “What kind of name is that for a band anyway? Beatles! Sound like a bunch of Bugs!”

As soon as they play the record, and it’s obvious that the 5 year old loves it, the film dissolves to 1973, picking up on the third verse of the song, when the boy is 14. His hair is long now, he plays guitar in a band, and they’re seen practicing a Beatles song.

From this point on, the film chronicles the life of the boy, from age 14 to 50, interspersed with flashbacks to the 60s Beatles era, with lots of Beatles music and solo post-Beatles songs used in the right places. In some ways, like in Across The Universe, the music makes the movie. The soundtrack is awesome! 

He graduates high school, gets married right out of college and enters the field of broadcasting, becoming a disc-jockey at a radio station in 1980. This career will take him to top of his field, and we experience that in phases, each phase augmented with relevant flashbacks which develop the factors that influenced him in his formative years. And all illustrated very creatively with Beatles music from that era.

We see him go from a local small town radio station, to a major market station in New York City, and on to being the host of a nationally syndicated radio show called Breakfast With The Beatles. Along the way he authors a book (or books) about The Beatles, and becomes recognized as one of, if not the foremost Beatles authorities in the world. Not bad for a 5 year old kid whose mother happened to play Meet The Beatles! for him in 1964! But the film lays it out very well, and it’s believable, unlike a lot of other films that stretch the truth a little too far. In this film, the lead character’s history is fictional, but that’s it. Everything else is true, and historically accurate. In that respect, it’s probably more like Forrest Gump than Across The Universe, but without reinventing history. It’s fun, believable, and never boring.

By the end of the film, our boy is a grandfather at age 50, with, conveniently, a 5 year old grandchild (get it? “Back in 1964 when I was only five.”) The two of them are sitting at a table playing The Beatles Trivial Pursuit game (the child is wearing a Meet The Beatles t-shirt of course, what else?) and the grandfather reads the card, “Name the 1964 album that started Beatlemania in the United States.” The child laughs and says, “Grandpa, I’m 5, you know I know that. It was Meet The Beatles!

And with that, the film comes full circle, the theme song begins, and the flashback is to 1964 when the family first plays the album, and a boy’s life is forever changed. It’s not often that a contemporary song can be turned into a credible movie script and the film is not just tolerable but actually enjoyable, but this goes way beyond that. This is pure entertainment, for the entire family, as well as a lesson about an important piece of music history. And speaking about the music, that catchy theme song will stay with you long after you’ve left the theater.

Meet The Beatles
(words and music by Bill Naughton, Jr.)
copyright 2014 Biliolga Music (ASCAP)
P.O. Box 146, Cobalt, CT 06414

BiliolgaMusic@aol.com

 


 

 

 

 


 

 

      MEET THE BEATLES 
              The Movie - Script Outline
                    by Bill Naughton, Jr.
                
copyright 2012 Biliolga Music (ASCAP)


Opening Scene:

An attractive woman, late 20s, running around shopping, in and out of the car.

Radio is tuned to WINS, Murray the K is covering The Beatles arrival and first press conference at Kennedy International Airport in New York City.

The woman goes into the record department of a major store. The record section is crowded with customers, mostly teenagers, mostly girls. Posters shout out, “Here Come The Beatles!”

She browses for 45s, chooses "There I’ve Said It Again" by Bobby Vinton and "Java" by Al Hirt.

She notices all the teenagers making a fuss over the record "I Want To Hold Your Hand."

She considers buying it, then she notices the advertisement for the album Meet The Beatles! She checks it out and notices that "I Want To Hold Your Hand" is on this album, along with 11 other songs.

She checks the cash in her wallet, sees that she has enough, and decides to buy the album Meet The Beatles!

She stands in line waiting to pay, listening to the teenagers talk about The Beatles.

She reaches the cashier, and while she pays, the cashier talks about how everyone is buying Beatles records.

He says, “ I’ve never seen anything like it. I heard in New York City they’re selling ten thousand records every
hour! Can you imagine? Ten thousand every hour! It’s crazy!”

She leaves the store with the records in a bag, and drives home. The Beatles are on the radio.

She enters the house where she is greeted by her husband (dressed in a sweater and tie, very clean cut, Ozzie Nelson type), and three kids, 5, 3 and 1. It’s chaotic in the house, loud, noisy.

She throws the bag with the records on a table with her other purchases, and hugs the kids.

She gets busy, fixing supper, catching up with her husband, engaging in routine conversation.

The family finally sits down at the table to eat. The television news is on in the background.

Walter Cronkite is seen making his now famous end of broadcast report covering the arrival of The Beatles at Kennedy International Airport. (“And that’s the way it is, Friday February 7, 1964”).

This reminds her that she bought some new records earlier in the day, and she tells her husband that she brought home his favorite new song, "Java" by Al Hirt.

He asks what else she bought, and she mentions the Bobby Vinton record, “and oh yeah, I picked up that new album Meet The Beatles! that everyone is talking about. You should have seen all the girls making a fuss over that in the store. The cashier said it’s selling like hotcakes.”

Her husband is surprised, “But isn’t that music for little kids? I mean, it’s loud and noisy, and those haircuts! I mean c’mon. That’s pretty weird, don’t you think?”

She replies, “I don’t know, I mean yeah, the kids are all buying it, but I’ve heard a couple songs and they sound pretty catchy. It just seems interesting, that’s all. It’s different, maybe because they’re from England, I don’t know. We’ll play it later and see what the buzz is all about.”

Her husband makes a sour face, “What kind of name is that for a band anyway? Beatles! Bugs!”

Later, the whole family is sitting around the record player, and we hear the final notes of "Java." The Dad smiles because he likes that song, and the Mom says, “Okay, now let’s listen to this record by The Beatles.”

She takes the record out of the sleeve, and puts the cover on the floor next to her 5 year old.

The 5 year old boy picks up the record cover, looks closely at it and asks, “What is this, Mom?”

Mom explains to the boy, “I bought a new record album today by an English band from a place called Liverpool. They’re called The Beatles, and they were even on the news tonight. They’re here now in the United States, and they’re going to be on The Ed Sullivan Show this Sunday night. Let’s listen to it and see what it sounds like.”

Dad shakes his head, unconvinced. The music begins to play, the boy smiles and begins to bop...

The family scene plays out while the movie theme song "Meet The Beatles" plays over the action.

Dissolve to 1973:

The third verse and chorus of "Meet The Beatles" plays out. The boy is now 14.
His hair is long, he’s wearing an Abbey Road-era t-shirt, he’s playing guitar with a garage band.

The rest of the movie takes place between 1973-2010, with continual flashbacks to the 1960’s….

Notes on some of the scenes:

Year: 1973
="Meet The Beatles" theme song fades into a scene from 1973, four teenagers are practicing with their band in a garage, working on the song, "Back In The USSR" and talking:

“You know Paul played drums on that song on The White Album.

“I heard he plays all the drums on his new album.”

“Yeah, my brother’s radio station’s going to get the album in advance today, he said he’d bring it over so we can hear it before it’s even released.”

“It must be cool to be a disc-jockey.”

“He says it’s the best thing Paul’s ever done.”

“I don’t know about that, it would be really hard to beat Ram.”

“Are you kidding me? You don’t think he can do better than Ram?"

“I don’t know man, think about this: 'Uncle Albert,' 'Smile Away,' 'Monkberry Moon Delight,' and 'Back Seat Of My Car' all on the same album. I mean, that’s right up there with Abbey Road!"

“What about Imagine? Lennon doesn’t rate?”

"Ram is a better album."

“Well, I think All Things Must Pass is the best Beatles solo album, hands down. Nothing even comes close.”

“You wait and see, Paul’s getting better all the time. What’s the name of the album anyway?”

“I think it’s called Band On the Run.

Music starts: opening guitar part for Band On The Run. The garage band keeps tuning up…

“Hey man, you got your harmonica? Let’s do 'I Should Have Known Better.'”
Band starts playing "I Should Have Known Better," with its signature harmonica riff.

Flashback to 1964: Family is at the drive-in movie theater watching the film A Hard Day’s Night.

Beatles highlights to be developed: Top 5 best selling singles in April 1964 were by
The Beatles.

World events to be mentioned
:


Year: 1976 = 17 years old. High School graduation. Going to college to major in broadcasting.

Transition Song: "Silly Love Songs" by Paul McCartney and Wings.

Beatles highlights to be developed: World tour by Paul McCartney and Wings.

World events to be mentioned: (to be developed)

Flashback to 1964: US Tour. The single "I Feel Fine/She's A Woman" and the US album Beatles '65.


Year: 1980 = 21 years old. College graduation. Starts working at a radio station. Gets engaged.

Transition Song: "Just Like Starting Over" by John Lennon.

Beatles highlights to be developed: John Lennon’s new album Double Fantasy. The death of John Lennon. George Harrison’s song, "All Those Years Ago."

World events to be mentioned(to be developed)

Flashback to 1965: The singles "Eight Days A Week/I Don't Want To Spoil The Party," "Ticket To Ride/Yes It Is," and "Help/I'm Down."  The Help movie and US soundtrack album. The US tour including the first Shea Stadium concert. The US single "Yesterday" (from the UK Help album).


Year: 1987 = 28 years old. Becoming a well-known broadcaster, married with a 5 year old child.

Transition Song:  "Got My Mind Set On You" by George Harrison.

Beatles highlights to be developed: George Harrison’s album Cloud Nine, and #1 single "Got My Mind Set On You."

World events to be mentioned: (to be developed)

Flashback to 1965: The US album Beatles 6. The single "We Can Work It Out/Day Tripper"
and the US version of Rubber Soul.

Year: 1992 = 32 years old. Working on the radio in New York City. Starts a Breakfast With The Beatles show.

Transition Song:  "Hope Of Deliverance" by Paul McCartney.

Beatles highlights to be developed: Paul McCartney plays in Brazil to the largest audience ever
assembled for a concert.

World events to be mentioned(to be developed)

Flashback to 1966: The US single "Nowhere Man/What Goes On." The US album Yesterday And Today, the controversy over the "Butcher Cover,” and the controversy over John’s “Bigger than Jesus” remarks. The US version of Revolver. The final US tour, the second Shea Stadium concert, and the Beatles final concert at Candlestick Park in San Francisco.


Year: 1996 = 37 years old. Top New York radio personality and host of a nationally syndicated program: Breakfast With the Beatles.

Transition Song: "Free As A Bird" by The Beatles from The Beatles Anthology 1.

Beatles highlights to be developed: The Beatles Anthology book, TV special, video release, three volume CD set and “new” single "Free As A Bird."

World events to be mentioned(to be developed)

Flashback to 1967: The single "Penny Lane/Strawberry Fields Forever." The album Sergeant Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. the single "All You Need Is Love/Baby You're A Rich Man," and the first world-wide satalite broadcast featuring The Beatles singing "All You Need Is Love."  The album and film Magical Mystery Tour.


Year: 2001 = 41 years old. Award winning, nationally known radio and television broadcaster.

Transition Song: The single, "The World Tonight" by Paul McCartney from Flaming Pie.

Beatles highlights to be developed:  Paul McCartney’s new album Flaming PieThe death of Linda McCartney. The death of George Harrison.

World events to be mentioned (to be developed)

Flashback to 1968: Paul marries Linda. John marries Yoko. Travel to India. The singles "Lady Madonna/The Inner Light," and "Hey Jude/Revolution."  Thirty new songs released on the double album The Beatles, which will become known as The White Album.

Year: 2005 = 45 years old. Recognized as a Beatles expert. Writing a book about The Beatles. Becomes a grandfather.

Transition Song: "Fine Line" by Paul McCartney from Chaos and Creation In The Backyard.

Beatles highlights to be developed: Cirque du Soleil developing a show based on The Beatles music to be called Love. Sir George Martin and his son Giles remix  Beatles music for show. The Love album.

World events to be mentioned(to be developed)

Flashback to  1969
: The Get Back studio sessions. The Rooftop Concert. The singles "Get Back/Don't Let Me Down," and "The Ballad of John and Yoko/Old Brown Shoe." The Yellow Submarine animated movie. The Abbey Road album. The break-up of The Beatles, the start of their solo careers.


Year: 2010 = 50 years old. Now a world famous broadcaster, author, and #1 Beatles historian.

Transition Song: "Sing The Changes" from the album Electric Arguments by The Fireman (Paul McCartney and Youth)

Beatles highlights to be developed: Remastered CDs, The Beatles Rock Band  video game, Beatles Trivial Pursuit game, Beatles Monopoly game. Paul McCartney closes Shea Stadium, plays CitiField, and releases a CD/DVD set of the epic concert.

World events to be mentioned(to be developed)


Famous Final Scene: Grandfather (the 5 year old child from 1964, now 50 years old) and his 5 year old grandchild, wearing a Beatles t-shirt, are sitting at a table playing the Beatles Trivial Pursuit game. 

Grandfather pulls a card and says, “Name the 1964 album that started Beatlemania in the US.”

Grandchild laughs and says, “Grandpa, I’m 5, you know I know that. It was Meet the Beatles!"

The theme song "Meet The Beatles" begins to play. They laugh, hug, and poke fun at each other.

Flashback to 1964: When he, as a 5 year old boy, first heard the album Meet the Beatles!, and that music changed his life. Credits roll and theme
song plays out.....















                         Meet The Beatles
                            (words and music by Bill Naughton, Jr.)

                   copyright 2013 Biliolga Music (ASCAP)
                                            P.O. Box 146, Cobalt, CT 06414
                                             BiliolgaMusic@aol.com











 


Beatles Memorabilia from the private collection of Bill Naughton, Jr. was displayed in a showcase at the East Hampton, CT Public Library in February 2009 to commemorate the 45th anniversary of The Beatles arrival in the United States, on Friday February 7, 1964. The article below is an expanded version of the four pages that were included at the top of the display case.


THE BEATLES
BEATLEMANIA IN THE U.S.
A brief history of what happened in early 1964, and why.
by:  Bill Naughton, Jr.
creator and original host of
Breakfast With The Beatles
on WWYZ
and writer of the popular song "
"Meet The Beatles."



"Beatlemania" was a term that was used for the first time in late 1963 by the media in England to describe the phenomenon that resulted from the enormous popularity of a rock ‘n roll band from Liverpool who called themselves "The Beatles."


After a few personnel changes, the group settled on a line-up consisting of:


  • John Lennon, Rhythm guitar, harmonica and vocals
  • Paul McCartney, Bass guitar and vocals
  • George Harrison, Lead guitar and vocals
  • Ringo Starr, Drums and occasional vocals

In England, it was said that never had a musical act achieved such a level of success as quickly as did The Beatles, particularly considering their dominance of the British music charts in 1963, although it’s important to note that they had been practicing practically non-stop, performing concerts, writing songs and developing their unique style for over five years, ever since founding member John Lennon met Paul McCartney on July 6, 1957. 


In 1962 The Beatles first single made it to #17 on the British charts:


 "Love Me Do/P.S. I Love You"  (October 5, 1962)

In 1963 The Beatles released four singles. All four went straight to #1:


  • "Please Please Me/Ask My Why"  (January 11, 1963)
  •   "From Me To You/Thank You Girl" (April 1, 1963)
  •    "She Loves You/I'll Get You" (August 23, 1963)
  • "I Want To Hold Your Hand/This Boy"  (November 29, 1963)

In 1963 The Beatles also released two albums, with 14 songs on each. Both albums went straight to #1:


  •   Please Please Me (March 22, 1963)
  •  With The Beatles  (November 22, 1963)

By October 1963 Beatlemania was in full swing, not only throughout Great Britain, but in 
Germany, Sweden, France and other European countries as well.

However, in the United States all of these hit records were rejected by Capitol Records, the American subsidiary
of EMI, The Beatles’ British label, despite the fact that EMI was selling millions and millions of Beatles records.

George Martin, The Beatles’ record producer, and Brian Epstein, their manager, were forced then to negotiate with a few small labels in the United States, and they were able to convince a few
to release The Beatles’ music in 1963:

  • Vee Jay Records released the singles "Please Please Me/Ask Me Why," and "From Me To You/Thank You Girl,"  both of which reached #1 in England, but neither sold well enough to even makes the national charts in the United States.
  • Swan Records released the single 'she Loves You/I'll Get You" but it didn't even crack the charts in the United States.
  • Vee Jay Records also prepared an album they called Introducing The Beatles, with songs from the British Please Please Me album, but then they changed their mind and decided not to release it in 1963 as originally planned.

As none of the records released on these small labels were successful, The Beatles remained relatively unknown in the United States throughout most of 1963. But that was about to change, in a big way. Here’s exactly what happened:


Ed Sullivan, host of a very popular Sunday evening variety show on American television, was passing through the London Airport on October 30,1963, when he observed a huge crowd waiting for, and cheering wildly for, someone. At first he thought perhaps a member of the Royal Family was there, but when he inquired, he was told that everyone was there to see The Beatles return from a short tour of Sweden. Although he had never heard of The Beatles, what he saw that day was enough to convince him to invite The Beatles to travel to New York City for a live appearance on his nationally broadcast Sunday night television show.  In November 1963, their manager, Brian Epstein, signed a contract for The Beatles to perform on The Ed Sullivan Show for three consecutive Sundays, February 9, 16 and 24, 1964.


Then in early December 1963, a disc-jockey in Washington D.C. played an imported copy of the #1 song in England, "I Want To Hold Your Hand.
The reaction from his listeners was overwhelmingly positive. Other radio stations started playing the record too. And suddenly, The Beatles could not be ignored any longer.

Capitol Records, finally realizing that they had the exclusive rights to what appeared to be a smash hit, decided to rush-release the record, with one significant change: they dropped the ballad "This Boy" from the B-side and replaced it with a rocker, "I Saw Her Standing There," 
which was the lead track on the British Please Please Me album.

  • "I Want To Hold Your Hand/I Saw Her Standing There" went on sale in the United States on December 26, 1963. It raced up the charts, and within a month it was #1.

Capitol Records then quickly put together a 12 track album featuring, by then, the # 1 single in the United States,  "I Want To Hold Your Hand/I Saw Her Standing There," plu
s "This Boy," and nine of the fourteen tracks from the British With The Beatles album, and released it with the title Meet The Beatles!

  • Meet The Beatles! went on sale in the United States on January 20, 1964 and went straight to #1, where it remained for a total of eleven weeks, before being replaced at the top of the charts on May 2 by The Beatles' Second Album.

By the middle of January 1964, Beatlemania had exploded all over the United States.


  • Vee Jay Records quickly released the album they had prepared but did not issue in 1963 called Introducing The Beatles. It went straight to #2, right behind Meet the Beatles!
  • Swan Records quickly re-released the 1963 single "She Loves You/I'll Get You." It went straight to #2, right behind "I Want To Hold Your Hand" and eventually reached #1.
  • Vee Jay Records re-released the 1963 single "Please Please Me" with "From Me To You," now on the flip side. It went straight to #3, right behind "I Want To Hold Your Hand" at #1 and "She Loves You" at  #2

By the time they arrived at Kennedy International Airport in New York City on Friday February 7, 1964, and made the first of their three legendary appearances on the Ed Sullivan Show on Sunday February 9, The Beatles had the top 3 best selling records in the United States:


  • #1: "I Want To Hold Your Hand (on Capitol Records)
  • #2: "She Loves You" (on Swan Records)
  • #3:" Please Please Me" (on Vee Jay Records)

And the hits just kept on coming!

  • Tollie Records, a subsidiary of Vee Jay Records, released the single "Twist and Shout/There's A Place" on March 2. It was a huge hit, eventually climbing all the way to the #2 spot on the charts. It was kept out of the coveted top spot by The Beatles themselves, with their new Capitol Records single.
  • Capitol Records released the official new Beatles single, "Can't Buy Me Love/You Can't Do That" on March 16. It sold a total of 940,225 copies on the day it was released, and went straight to #1.
  • Vee Jay Records released "Do You Want To Know A Secret" as a single on March 23, with "Thank You Girl" on the flip side. It climbed all the way to #2 on the charts, right behind "Can't Buy Me Love" which was #1.
  • Also on March 23, Vee Jay Records released an EP titled Souvenir of their Visit To America, which featured four songs from the Introducing The Beatles album, "Misery," "A Taste of Honey," "Ask Me Why," and "Anna." This record did not sell very well, as EPs were never as popular in the United States as they were in England, and most people already had these songs on the Vee Jay album.

Then, at the peak of Beatlemania in the United States, something phenomenal happened that had never happened before and, as everyone knows, will never, and could never, happen again:


On April 4, 1964, the Beatles held the Top 5 spots on the best selling singles charts in the United States:


  • #1: "Can't Buy Me Love"
  • #2: "Twist and Shout"
  • #3: "She Loves You"
  • #4: "I Want To Hold Your Hand"
  • #5: "Please Please Me"

A total of 11 singles by The Beatles were on the charts that week. In addition to the Top 5 listed above,
The Beatles also charted at #31, 46, 58, 65, 68 and 79.  And Meet The Beatles! and Introducing The Beatles
were the #1 and #2 best selling albums.

  • Capitol Records then pieced together another album with "She Loves You" plus two songs from a new British EP, "Long Tall Sally" and "I Call Your Name," three B-sides of hit singles, "Thank You Girl,' 'I'll Get You,' and "You Can't Do That," and the five songs from With The Beatles  that they did not include on Meet The Beatles! and released it as The Beatles' Second Album on April 10. The Beatles' Second Album eventually replaced Meet the Beatles in the #1 spot, which was the first time an artist had ever replaced themselves in the #1 spot on the national album charts. 
  • Tollie Records released "Love Me Do/P.S. I Love You" on April 27. It went all the way to #1.
  • Capitol Records then released another EP, Four By The Beatles featuring "Roll Over Beethoven," "All My Loving," "This Boy" and "Please Mr. Postman," on May 11, 1964, but like the previous EP, it didn't sell well, as EPs were not as popular in the United States as they were in England.

And as if all that was not enough, then along came A Hard Day's Night. First the music, and then the movie.  

  • United Artists Records issued the album, A Hard Day's Night,  their “soundtrack” album from the soon to be released United Artists movie staring The Beatles, on June 26. This “soundtrack” album was unique to the United States market, and was actually issued seventeen days before the “official” release date for the new Beatles album on Parlophone Records in England. This album contained only seven new Beatles songs, plus "Can't Buy Me Love," the #1 single from a few months back which was featured prominently in the movie. The rest of the album was filled out with incidental film music arranged and conducted by producer George Martin, but that didn’t hurt the record’s sales at all. The album spent a total of twenty eight weeks in the Top Ten, fourteen of those weeks at #1, which was the longest run in the #1 spot of any album in 1964, and it succeeded in driving Beatlemania to new heights in the United States.
  • Capitol Records then released "A Hard Day's Night" as a single on July 13, with one significant change: they replaced the official B-side, "Things We Said Today" with "I Should Have Known Better," a song from the movie. Despite the fact that everyone was buying the United Artists soundtrack album which contained these two songs, the single went straight to #1. 
  • Capitol Records then pieced together another album featuring three songs from the non-film side of the British album A Hard Day's Night and two songs from the British EP Long Tall Sally, all of which had not yet been issued in the United States, along with five songs that had already been included on the United Artists Soundtrack album, and the totally unnecessary German language remake of "I Want To Hold Your Hand," and released it with the title Something New on July 20. This was the fifth Beatles album to be issued in the United States over the relatively short time span of only six months, and it went straight to #2, kept out of the #1 spot by the United Artists soundtrack album A Hard Day's Night which stayed at #1 for fourteen weeks. For the second time in six months, The Beatles held the top two spots on the national album charts.
  • Also on July 20, Capitol Records released two singles from the Something New album. "And I Love Her/If I Fell" and "I’ll Cry Instead/I’m Happy Just To Dance With You" received heavy radio airplay but only sold moderately, as everyone who bought one or both of the new Beatles albums realized that they were already buying these songs, as all four songs were included on both new albums. 
  • Finally, on August 11, the United Artists film, A Hard Day’s Night, was released to movie theaters in the United States. The working title of this film had been “Beatlemania,” and that’s exactly what it depicted, a look into a wild day in the life of The Beatles, featuring their music and their frenzied fans. It was the hit of the late summer, and early fall. It was the movie event of the year, and it capped a tremendous seven month period in which The Beatles completely dominated the radio, the television, print media, record sales and finally movie theaters. 

So, in a nutshell, that’s what happened. As to why it happened, here’s my simple explanation:

When The Beatles first  arrived in the United States they brought with them their entire catalog of recorded music, all the songs that they recorded and released in England from late 1962 to early 1964 – a total of 34 songs from 5 singles and 2 albums, and radio stations played every song over and over again in early 1964. 

All the incredible music that had already been released in England in 1962 and 1963 was heard for the first time in the United States in the first few months of 1964. And just when you thought you’d heard it all, there was more. 

That initial deluge of 34 songs was followed by 16 more songs released over the course of the next few months, bringing the total to 50 “new” Beatles songs that were issued in the United States during the first half of 1964. 

All the songs were excellent, Beatles music was different and exciting, and The Beatles themselves were simply irresistible, with their long hair and British accents. They wrote their own songs, they played really catchy guitar chords and they sang like songbirds, with perfect three-part harmonies. The Beatles were the complete package. 

All of a sudden it seemed as if The Beatles were everywhere. In addition to the hit records, there were Beatles trading cards, Beatles books and magazines, Beatle wigs, dolls, lunchboxes and games. But the main reason why Beatlemania happened in the United States in 1964 was the quality, as well as the quantity, of their music. 

It was an all out musical and cultural assault. It was something that had never been experienced by a whole new generation of young people coming of age in the 1960s. Their mothers may have had Frank Sinatra to swoon over in the 1940s, and teenage girls screamed over Elvis Presley in the late 1950s, but Beatlemania in the1960s was something different, it was new and exciting, and it was immediately and completely embraced by that new generation of record buying teenagers, and even pre-teenagers. It was unprecedented, it was unbelievable, and it was absolutely impossible to ignore. Kids either liked The Beatles or they didn’t. And almost every kid liked them.

It all came down to the fact that the music was just so good. And you just couldn’t get away from it, the music was everywhere. You couldn’t turn on the radio without hearing a Beatles song. There were so many songs. It seemed like there was always something new, a new song you hadn’t heard yet. No one could believe that one group could have so many incredible new songs. It was absolutely overwhelming. And then… there was the movie.

It all happened once upon a time, in 1963 in England and in 1964 in the United States. And then it spread all over the world. It was the phenomenon that will forever be known as Beatlemania, the likes of which could never, and will never, happen again. For those lucky enough to have lived through it, it remains an unforgettable experience.


“My Mom played Meet The Beatles! and that music changed my life.”*

*from the song, "Meet The Beatles," by Bill Naughton, Jr. 
copyright 2012 BiliolgaMusic (ASCAP)



www.MeetTheBeatles.us


 


The Beatles First Visit To The U.S.
February 7-21,1964











The First Show
February 9, 1964, Live From New York City

First Set:
All My Loving
Till There Was You
She Loves You

Second Set:
I Saw Her Standing There
I Want To Hold Your Hand





The Second Show
 February 16, 1964, Live From Miami Beach




First Set:
She Loves You
This Boy
All My Loving

Second Set:
I Saw Her Standing There
From Me To You
I Want To Hold Your Hand





The Third Show
February 23, 1964, On Tape From New York City




First Set:
Twist And Shout
Please Please Me

Second Set:
I Want To Hold Your Hand


This three song performance was recorded
on the afternoon of February 9, 1964, before their first live appearance, and broadcast on February 23, 1964, after they had left the United States to return to England.










The First Beatles Concert In The U.S.
Washington, D.C., February 11, 1964

 

The day after their first appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show, The Beatles traveled by train from New York City to Washington, D.C. where they were scheduled to perform their first official concert in the United States, at The Coliseum, on February 11, 1964.



The Beatles performed twelve songs at the Washington, D.C. concert:

Roll Over Beethoven
From Me To You
I Saw Her Standing There
This Boy
All My Loving
I Want To Be Your Man
Please Please Me
Til There Was You
She Loves You
I Want To Hold Your Hand
Twist And Shout
Long Tall Sally

 




The Washington D.C. Coliseum concert was taped by CBS for a closed circuit broadcast screened in movie theaters across the United States on March 14 and 15, 1964.




The Beatles at Carnegie Hall
New York City, February 12, 1964




The day after the concert in Washington, D.C., The Beatles returned to New York City for two concerts at the famed Carnegie Hall. Sources indicate that The Beatles performed the same set at these concerts on February 12, 1964 as they did the day before in Washington D.C.






  A Week In Miami Beach, Florida




After their two concerts at Carnegie Hall in New York City, The Beatles traveled to Miami Beach, Florida where they performed their second Ed Sullivan Show live from the Deauville Hotel on February 16, and then spent a week vacationing on the beach and in the sun before flying back to England on February 21, 1964.



The Beatles casual rehearsal for the February 16, 1964 Ed Sullivan Show.







 
The Beatles' first three hit singles
in the United States, early 1964





 I Want To Hold Your Hand/ I Saw Her Standing There

The official release date for the first Beatles single on Capitol Records in the United States was January 13, 1964, but there are sources that say that because some radio stations in the United States had started playing imported copies of the British single on Parlophone Records, Capitol Records pushed up the release date to December 26, 1963. If this were true, then the record should have charted the first week of January, however, it didn't chart until January 18, went to #3 on January 25, and hit #1 on February 1, 1964, where it stayed for seven weeks. So January 13 seems to make more sense as the release date for this landmark record that established The Beatles in the United States.






She Loves You/I'll Get You
 
Originally released September 16, 1963 on Swan Records, then reissued with strong promotion in January 1964 to coincide with the first wave of Beatlemania in the United States. It was a huge hit, going straight to #2 and eventually replacing "I Want To Hold Your Hand" at  #1 on the charts.






Please, Please Me/From Me To You
 
Released January 30, 1964 on Vee Jay Records. Both "Please Please Me/Ask My Why" and "From Me To You/Thank You Girl" "  had originally been released by Vee Jay Records in 1963, but they did not sell very well at that time. This single, featuring the A-sides of the two original singles, released with strong promotion to coincide with the first wave of Beatlemania in the United States, was a huge hit, reaching #3 on the charts. It would have been a #1 song if were not for the two Beatles singles that were ahead of it on the charts at the time. "I Want To Hold Your Hand" at #1 and She Loves You" at #2, so this great Beatles single, "Please Please Me/Ask Me Why"   could only go as far as #3 at the time.

In February and March 1964, The Beatles had the top three best selling records in the United States. The last week of March they had the top four. The first week of April they had the top five!





 
The Beatles hold down the Top 5 spots
on the Billboard record charts,
April 4, 1964




#1: Can't Buy Me Love


#2: Twist And Shout


#3: She Loves You


#4: I Want To Hold Your Hand



#5: Please Please Me



(Photographed by Bill Naughton Jr. from his personal collection.)






 
The Vee Jay Records Album
Introducing The Beatles


The First Beatles album released in the United States was not Meet The Beatles, but rather Introducing The Beatles, which was released on January 10, 1964.




Introducing The Beatles was prepared for release by Vee Jay Records in July 1963 but not actually issued at that time. Then in January 1964, just as Beatlemania was beginning to spread across the United States, it was rush released ten days ahead of the Capitol Records album Meet the Beatles!

Introducing The Beatles contained twelve of the fourteen songs on The Beatles first British album, Please Please Me. It reached #2 on the US album charts, held out of the #1 spot by the Capitol Records album
Meet the Beatles!


There were actually two early versions of the album, the first version was released on January 10, 1964 and contained "Love Me Do" and "P.S I Love You."  But because by that time Capitol Records had aquired the rights to those two songs, Vee Jay Records was forced to remove those two songs from their album and they replaced them with "Please Please Me" and "Ask My Why," which actually may have helped album sales as  "Please Please Me" was a huge hit single at that time while "Love Me Do"   had not yet been released as a single. This revised version of Introducing The Beatles was issued on February 10, 1964, the day after 70 million people in the United States watched The Beatles first appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show. It sold over 1.3 million copies.

Vee Jay Records then repackaged the album and released the same songs with a different cover, and a different title, on October 12, 1964. That album, with the famous "gate-fold cover" was called Songs Pictures and Stories of The Fabulous Beatles
, although the record inside the new cover still had the title Introducing the Beatles. This version is very sought after by collectors.













 
     
The Capitol Records Album 
 
Meet The Beatles!


On January 20, 1964, 10 days after Introducing The Beatles was released in the United States by Vee Jay Records, Capitol Records issued what they claimed to be "The First Album By England's Phenomenal Pop Combo."  Meet the Beatles! as we know, was not the first Beatles album released in the United States, but it was the first Beatles album released by Capitol Records, and due to the tremendous amount of publicity preceding the release date, it became the breakthrough album for The Beatles in the United States. By the time The Beatles arrived in New York City for their first visit, it was the #1 album on the charts, and it spent a total of 11 weeks at #1 before being bumped by what Capitol Records called The Beatles' Second Album.

Meet The Beatles!
was the first of what would be a series of what I call "patchwork albums" released by Capitol Records in 1964, 1965 and 1966. Basically a chopped up version of their second British album, With The Beatles, which had been released on November 22, 1963, it was very cleverly structured around the hit single "I Want To Hold Your Hand," which was the lead track on the album, followed by the flip side of the #1 U.S. single, "I Saw Her Standing There,"  and the flip side of the #1 British single, "This Boy." The remaining three tracks on Side One were actually the first three tracks on With The Beatles, and Side Two contained six of the remaining eleven tracks from the British album. Capitol Records saved the other five songs, all cover songs, to form a starting point for what they would misleadingly call The Beatles' Second Album.  But at the time no one knew this, and Meet The Beatles! was all anyone really cared about anyway.

It was a great album, and there are millions of baby boomers who were growing up in the United States in 1964 who can now relate to these song lyrics:


"My Mom played Meet The Beatles! and that  music changed my life." *

* from the song
"Meet The Beatles" by Bill Naughton, Jr.
copyright 2014 BiliolgaMusic (ASCAP)





Twist And Shout



On March 2, 1964, Tollie Records, a subsidiary of Vee Jay records, released the single "Twist and Shout/There's a Place."
"Twist and Shout  was well known by that time because it was being played on the radio as a track from Introducing the Beatles, and The Beatles had performed "Twist and Shout" on their third Ed Sullivan appearance on February 23. It was a huge hit, spending a total of eleven weeks on the chart, four of those weeks at #2. It was kept out of the #1 spot by "Can't Buy Me Love, "The Beatles "official" new single, which was #1 at the time.





Can't Buy Me Love



The Capitol Records single "Can't Buy Me Love/You Can't Do That," was released in the United States on March 16, 1964. It went straight to #1, where it stayed for five weeks.




Do You Want To Know A Secret


The Vee Jay Records single "Do You Want To Know A Secret/Thank You Girl" 
and the Vee Jay Records EP (Extended Play), Souvenier of Their Visit To America,  were both released in the United States on March 23, 1964. The single sold very well, making it to #2 by the first week in May, but the EP, with four songs from the album Introducing The Beatles,  did not sell that well, as the EP format was not as popular in the United States as it was in England.






 
The Album That Capitol Records
Misleadingly Titled:
The Beatles' Second Album




Released on April 10, 1964, just under three months after Meet the Beatles, this was a patchwork album, pieced together from several sources and featured the five songs from With The Beatles that were not included on Meet the Beatles, three B-sides of hit singles, two songs from a new British EP, and "She Loves You,"  for which Capitol Records had just aquired the rights. Of course, this album went straight to #1, replacing Meet the Beatles in the top spot on the album chart.

Was this really The Beatles' Second Album? Of course not. But it was "The Beatles' Second Capitol Records Album" that was released in the United States. As mentioned above, there had already been two Beatles albums  released in the United States, Meet The Beatles and Introducing The Beatles. For Capitol Records to insinuate that this was the Beatles official second album was inappropriate, misleading and remains grossly inaccurate.







Love Me Do/P.S. I Love You


The Tollie Records single "Love Me Do/P.S. I Love You" was released in the United States on April 27, 1964. This was The Beatles first single in England in late 1962, and it reached #17 on the charts. At the peak of Beatlemania in the United States it reached #1, on May 30, 1964.






 
Beatlemania! With The Beatles
The First Canadian Album Was The First Beatles Album Released In North America




 The first Beatles album released in North America, Beatlemaina! With The Beatles, was released in Canada just a few days after With The Beatles was released in England. Some sources say the record was released on November 25, 1963, and other sources say December 3, 1963, but whichever date is accurate, it remains true that it was issued at least a month before MeetThe Beatles! was released in the United States. The Canadian album featured the same songs that were on the British WithThe Beatles album. Though never officially on sale in the United States, the songs were broadcast into the northern-most states via Canadian radio stations and many residents of those states made the trip across the border to buy the record, both before and after MeetThe Beatles! was released in the United States, eventually turning Beatlemania! With The Beatles into a valuable collector's item in the United States.





Twist and Shout
 The Second Canadian Album





The Second Canadian Beatles album, Twist and Shout, was released on February 3, 1964, just two weeks after Meet The Beatles! was released in the United States, and just four days before The Beatles arrived in New York City. The album featured most of the songs that were on the British Please Please Me album, with the exception of "Misery,"  perhaps the most under-rated and under-appreciated Lennon-McCartney song, which was omitted in order to accommodate the hit "She Loves You."

Capitol Records of Canada also released singles that differed from the Capitol Records 45s in the United States. Of particular interest to Beatles fans was "Roll Over Beethoven" and "Please Mr. Postman" which was released in Canada on December 9, 1963, several months before the songs were made available in the United States. And even more impressive was the perfect pairing of "All My Loving" and "This Boy," released on February  17, 1964. Both of these singles were big hits in Canada.

Capitol Records in the United States tried to duplicate that success by releasing the four songs from the two Canadian singles as an EP (Extended Play) 45 rpm record in the United States, but the record buyers in the United States were not very interested in the EP format, and Four By the Beatles did not sell well. Everybody already had the songs on albums by then anyway.






 

Four By The Beatles




Four By The Beatles, an EP (Extended Play) record which was released on May 11, 1964 on Capitol Records in the United States. It did not sell well, as record buyers in the United States never completely embraced the EP format, which was much more popular in England.

A note about EPs: There were several
EPs by The Beatles that sold fairly well in England, even though record buyers probably already had the songs on other albums and singles. The best EP out of all the British releases was Long Tall Sally, released on June 19, 1964, just two weeks before the landmark album A Hard Day's Night was released in England.  For the first and only time, all four songs on a Beatles EP had never been released previously in England. The EP featured the songs "Long Tall Sally" and "I Call Your Name," both of which had been previously issued  in the United States on what Capitol Records inappropriately called The Beatles' Second Album, released in the United States on April 10, 1964, and also "Slow Down" and "Matchbox," which had yet to be released anywhere, and would eventually show up in the United States on the Capitol Records patchwork album called Something New, released on July 20, 1964. 









 





A Hard Day's Night
The U.S. Sound Track Album
on United Artists Records


The biggest influence for United Artists surrounding their decision to finance, film and distribute the first feature length film starring The Beatles, was the agreement that United Artists Records would have first rights to release the music used in the film in the United States on an official sound track album. Thus it was that in the United States, the fourth Beatles album released in the short time span of six months, was the United Artist Original Motion Picture Sound Track from the movie
A Hard Day's Night.

This version was released in the United States only on June 26, 1964, and spent fourteen weeks at #1, and another fourteen weeks in the top ten. It has become somewhat rare these days, interest in it relegated primarily to collectors, and probably mostly for the strikingly attractive cover which has become one of the
classic
images of Beatlemania 1964.


The sound track album contained only seven new Beatles songs, and "Can't Buy Me Love," a #1 single from April 1964. The rest of the album was filled out with incidental music arranged and conducted by George Martin, the most memorable of these pieces was called "Ringo's Theme," an instrumental version of "This Boy" that was used in one of the major scenes of the film when Ringo was walking alone by the river.

The official full length Beatles album, A Hard Day's Night, with thirteen songs, seven from the film on side one and six non-film songs on side two, was released
on Parlophone Records in England  on July 10, 1964. That version has become the definitive Hard Day's Night album.




A Hard Day's Night/I Should Have Known Better



The Capitol Records single "A Hard Day's Night/I Should Have Known Better," was released in the United States on July 13, 1964. By the end of the month it was #1.

The official Beatles single,
"A Hard Day's Night/Things We Said Today," was released
on Parlophone Records in England on July 10, 1964.




A scene from the concert at the end of the film A Hard Day's Night.





 
Something New
Another Capitol Records
Patchwork Album


In the United States, most but not all of the remaining songs from the non-film side of the British album A Hard Day's Night, songs that were not included on the United Artists Sound Track album, were compiled and released by Capitol Records, along with a few songs which were previously released on the United Artists Soundtrack album, two songs which had not yet been issued in the United States from the British Long Tall Sally EP, and the German language remake of "I Want To Hold Your Hand,"
which was entirely unnecessary for release in the United States. Inexplicably not included on this album was the song "I'll Be Back," one of the strongest songs from Side Two of the British album, which held by Capitol Records and not released in the United States until December on the patchwork album Beatles '65. Capitol Records, very creatively as usual, called this patchwork album Something New. (At least they didn't call it The Beatles' Third Album!)

Something New was released on July 20, 1964, and went straight to #2, right behind A Hard Day's Night, which spent 13 weeks at #1.





On the same day, July 20, 1964, Capitol Records issued two singles from the  Something New album:



"And I Love Her/If I Fell"
reached #12 on the charts
.




"I'll Cry Instead/I'm Happy Just To Dance With You"

made it to #25.




Then on August 24, 1964, Capitol Records issued a third single from the 
Something New album:




"Match Box/Slow Down"
peaked at #17.


These three singles were not big hits, but they really weren't expected to be. Capitol Records was just milking their albums for everything they could get. They knew that these records would help keep The Beatles in heavy rotation on the radio, and that some people would buy the singles, but more people, after hearing the songs on the radio, would buy the album that they came from, which helped keep the album in the top ten for eighteen weeks.


 
"And I Love Her/If I Fell" was a pretty good choice for a single off the album, but a better choice for either of the other two might have been "Things We Said Today/Anytime At All," but that's just my opinion.)

After the release of Something New, and the three spin off singles, it would be a little over four months until
the next new Beatles single and album would be released. But Beatlemania did not slow down, in fact, it continued to escalate with their triumphant return to the United States.



 
The Beatles First U.S. Tour
August 19-September 20, 1964


  Within a month after the release of Something New, and less than two months after A Hard Day's Night,  when both albums were at the top of the charts, #1 and #2, The Beatles were back in the United States for their first extended concert tour.



The Beatles played 32 shows in 22 days, breaking attendance records as they appeared at major arenas throughout the United States and Canada. The tour began with a show at The Cow Palace in San Francisco, California, and ended with a show at The Paramount Theater in New York City. It was after their final concert in New York City that John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr met Bob Dylan for the first time, and Dylan reportedly introduced The Beatles to a new level of consciousness.



On August 23, 1964, The Beatles played their first concert at the famed Hollywood Bowl, in Los Angeles, California. Capitol Records recorded this show, with plans to release a live concert album that autumn, but the quality of the recording was not considered to be good enough, due to the level of noise created by screaming fans, and the plans for a live Beatles album were canceled. Thirteen years later, advanced technology allowed producer George Martin to clean up those 1964 tapes, along with tapes from the 1965 concert, and he produced the live album called The Beatles At The Hollywood Bowl, which was released in 1977. It's a very good record, but these days the vinyl is hard to find, and the album has never been released on CD.



The Beatles' show consisted of twelve songs on their 1964 U.S. tour:
 

Twist and Shout
You Can't Do That
All My Loving
She Loves You
Things We Said Today
Roll Over Beethoven
Can't Buy Me Love
If I Fell
I Want To Hold Your Hand
Boys
A Hard Day's Night
Long Tall Sally


* It has been reported in some books that on some shows, The Beatles would open with  "I Saw Her Standing There," drop "She Loves You,"  and close with "Twist and Shout."


The Beatles Live At The Hollywood Bowl


The record cover that Capitol Records prepared for the
live album that was recorded but not released in 1964.






I Feel Fine/She's A Woman



The Capitol Records single  "I Feel Fine/She's A Woman" was released in the United States on November 23, 1964. It went straight to #1 where it spent a total of three weeks over the 1964 Christmas season.


The Beatles' Story




 

The Capitol Records double disc documentary
called The Beatles' Story was released in the United States on November 23, 1964, the same day that "I Feel Fine/She's A Woman" was released.  It actually spent five weeks in the top 10, peaking at  #7 on the best selling album chart.





 
Beatles '65
A variation on Beatles For Sale


The next official Beatles album, Beatles For Sale, was released on Parlophone Records in England on December 4, 1964, then chopped up and issued in the United States as Beatles '65 on December 15, 1964.




Several of the songs on Beatles For Sale were held back by Capitol Records for release as a single or on another patchwork album in 1965. For example, "Eight Days A Week" and "I Don't Want To Spoil The Party" from Beatles For Sale, were issued as a single in the United States on February 15, 1965, and together with the remaining tracks held over from Beatles For Sale, were issued on a patchwork album that Capitol Records again misleadingly called Beatles 6, on June 14, 1965, although The Beatles had officially issued only four albums at that time (Please Please Me, With The Beatles, A Hard Day's Night, and Beatles For Sale.)

Apparently Capitol Records figured they could get away with calling this compilation
Beatles 6 because they counted The Early Beatles
an album they issued on March 6, 1965, as the fifth Beatles album. Of course that was not correct, because they didn't count  Introducing The Beatles and, perhaps more importantly,  A Hard Day's Night. The Early Beatles was basically a reissue of the British Please Please Me album that Capitol Records had just obtained the rights to repackage and issue on their label. It wasn't the fifth Beatles album, and Beatles 6 was not the sixth. It may have been the sixth Capitol Records Beatles album, but it's still misleading and inaccurate from a historical perspective.

The arrogance of Capitol Records surrounding their repackaging of the British Beatles albums remains unforgivable. Beatles fans in the United States were denied the privilege of hearing The Beatles' albums as The Beatles had prepared them,  and intended them to be heard, throughout 1964, 1965 and 1966.

This practice of butchering Beatles albums to allow for extra singles and multiple albums in the United States finally ended with the release of Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band in 1967. That album, and all future albums, were issued exactly as they were prepared by The Beatles and George Martin. (There was, however, a variation on the Magical Mystery Tour album, although the U.S. album did contain all five songs that were on the British EP, plus some singles on side two. And the 1970 album called The Beatles Again, also known as Hey Jude was basically a greatest hits album and was unique to the U.S. market.)

 These days, thankfully, the official Beatles albums are the British versions, the way the songs were originally sequenced and released, which is the way The Beatles and George Martin always wanted it to be.



The Beatles and producer George Martin receiving
a gold record signifying a million dollars in sales.




 
The First Year of Beatlemania in the U.S.

During the first year of Beatlemania in the United States, more than sixty songs by The Beatles from seven official British singles, four British albums and a British EP were issued (depending on who does the counting and what they count, it could be between sixty one and seventy something. I think sixty three would be an accurate number.)

And that was what Beatlemania was all about. The music. Yes, The
Beatles were different, interesting, and charismatic, but what it all came down to was the music. The music was irresistible. And it still is....

"Their music sounds as good today as it did back that first time,
My Mom played Meet The Beatles and that music changed my life." *


* from the song  Meet The Beatles by Bill Naughton, Jr.
copyright 2012 BiliolgaMusic (ASCAP)









 
Meet The The Beatles
And A Few Other Fan Magazines
From Early 1964


(Photographed by Bill Naughton Jr. from his personal collection.)





















 


 


The Teen Screen Individual Beatle Magazines From Early 1964

(Photographed by Bill Naughton Jr. from his personal collection.)

According to Bill Naughton, Jr., who owns the complete set of 1964 Teen Screen Individual Beatle magazines pictured below, "This is probably the piece of Beatles memorabilia I am most proud of having aquired, as well as perhaps the most valuable and coveted part of my collection. I had an opportunity to purchase this complete set, for what I considered to be a pretty reasonable price, at The Great Escape in Nashville when I worked in that great city in the 80s, and I've held on to it ever since. I have no intention of selling it, although the complete set is worth more now than I would have imagined. The magazine are 'near mint,' only because I looked at them once before putting them in plastic protectors, and I removed them this year to take these photographs. Otherwise, they are in 'mint condition.'  I'm sure there are very few, if any, complete sets of these magazines still around."























 
A Few Beatles Paperback Books
From Early 1964

(Photographed by Bill Naughton Jr. from his personal collection.)























 
 


Authentic Beatles Memorabilia From Early 1964

(Photographed by Bill Naughton Jr. from his personal collection.)

























 



The First Beatles Bubble Gum Card Collection From Early 1964
The entire First Series, cards 1-60.
(Scanned through a Pandigital PhotoLink One-Touch Scanner, PANCN02,
by Bill Naughton, Jr., from his personal collection.)







The Beatles Bubble Gum cards went on sale in the United States in early 1964 at the beginning of Beatlemania. The original package, below, contained five cards and a stick of bubble gum, and sold for five cents in grocery stores, drug stores and old fashioned 5 and 10 Cent Stores. These days, single cards go for three to five dollars each, depending on condition. Several years ago, this entire first series, cards 1-60, from the personal collection of Bill Naughton, Jr., was appraised at around three hundred dollars. It may even be worth more than that these days.

It is a bit disappointing that the cards lost quite a bit of clarity when they were scanned onto an SD memory card using a Pandigital PhotoLink One-Touch Scanner (PANSCN02) and uploaded to this page, but remember they are printed on cardboard, not photo paper. But even though the quality of these reproductions is not that good, I am still proud to be able to include this complete collection of the first series on my Meet The Beatles Home Page.





The original wax paper package for
the 1964 Beatles Bubble Gum cards.
(Scanned throgh a Pandigital PhotoLink One-Touch Scanner, PANCN02,
by Bill Naughton, Jr., from his personal collection.)





click on a link below to go directly to that card
:


(Some of my favorites are # 1, 14, 20, 22, 25, 33, 47 and 49.
My favorite is #47, the first picture I ever saw of The Beatles.)



Card #1
, Card #2, Card #3, Card #4, Card #5, Card # 6,
Card #7, Card 8, Card #9, Card #10,Card #11, Card #12,
Card #13,
Card #14, Card #15, Card #16, Card #17, Card #18,
Card #19, Card #20, Card #21, Card #22, Card #23, Card #24,
Card #25
, Card #26, Card #27, Card #28, Card #29, Card #30,
Card #31, Card #32, Card #33, Card #34, Card #35, Card #36,
Card #37, Card #38, Card #39, Card #40, Card #41, Card #42,
Card #43, Card #44, Card #45, Card #46, Card #47, Card #48,
Card #49, Card #50, Card #51, Card #52, Card #53, Card #54,
Card #55, Card #56, Card #57, Card #58, Card #59, Card #60







 

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Thank you very much for visiting The Official Meet The Beatles Home Page
inspired by the very catchy song
Meet The Beatles by Bill Naughton, Jr.
 
Click on this link to go directly to the song Meet The Beatles.
Click on this link to go back to the links at the top of this page.
Click on this link to go to the top of the Biliolga Music Home Page.

Click on this link to go to the no-budget homemade ukulele video at www.YouTube.com/MeetTheBeatlesSong *
* not the official demo, the You Tube version does not include the bridge. 

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